Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/18071
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBorja, Lairton Souza-
dc.contributor.authorSousa, Orlando Marcos Farias de-
dc.contributor.authorSolcà, Manuela da Silva-
dc.contributor.authorBastos, Leila Andrade-
dc.contributor.authorBordoni, Marcelo-
dc.contributor.authorMagalhães, Jairo Torres-
dc.contributor.authorLarangeira, Daniela Farias-
dc.contributor.authorMelo, Stella Maria Barrouin-
dc.contributor.authorFraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé-
dc.contributor.authorVeras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-17T13:48:01Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-17T13:48:01Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationBORJA, L. S. et al. Parasite load in the blood and skin of dogs naturally infected by Leishmania infantum is correlated with their capacity to infect sand fly vectors. Veterinary Parasitology, v. 229, p. 110–117, 2016.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn0304-4017pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/18071-
dc.description.sponsorshipInstituto de Ciência e Tecnologia em Doenças Tropicais (INCT-DT- Grantnumber: 576269/2008-5) and Fundação de Amparo a Pesquisa daBahia (FAPESB – Grant number: SUS0011/2010)pt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherElsevierpt_BR
dc.rightsopen accesspt_BR
dc.subject.otherInfecção caninapt_BR
dc.subject.otherCarga parasitáriapt_BR
dc.subject.otherXenodiagnósticopt_BR
dc.titleParasite load in the blood and skin of dogs naturally infected by Leishmania infantum is correlated with their capacity to infect sand fly vectorspt_BR
dc.typeArticlept_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vetpar.2016.10.004-
dc.description.abstractenThe sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is primarily responsible for the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the New World, and dogs are considered to be the main urban reservoir of this disease. In order to improve the efficacy of control measures, it is essential to assess the transmission capacity of Leishmania infantum to the sand fly vector by naturally infected dogs. The present study investigated the existence of correlations between canine clinical presentation and the intensity of parasite load in the blood, skin and spleen of naturally infected dogs. In addition, we also attempted to establish correlations between the intensity of parasite load in canine tissue and the parasite load detected in sandflies five days after feeding on naturally infected dogs. A total of 23 dogs were examined and classified according to clinical manifestation of canine VL. Blood samples, splenic aspirate and skin biopsies were collected and parasite DNA was quantified by qPCR. Canine capacity to infect Lu. longipalpis with parasites was evaluated by xenodiagnosis and parasite loads were measured five days after feeding. No significant differences were observed with respect to canine clinical manifestation and the parasite loads detected in the blood, skin and spleen samples obtained from naturally infected dogs. Regardless of clinical canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) presentation and the degree of parasite burden, almost half of the dogs successfully infected sandflies with parasites, albeit to a low number of sandflies with correspondingly low parasite loads. Parasite loads in both canine blood and skin were shown to be positively correlated with the canine infectiousness to the sand fly vector, and positive correlations were also observed with respect to these tissues and the sand fly infection rate, as well as the parasite load detected in sandflies following xenodiagnosis. In conclusion, this indicates that parasite loads in both blood and skin can function as potentially reliable markers of canine capacity to infect sand fly vector.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal da Bahia. Escola de Medicina Veterinária. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal da Bahia. Escola de Medicina Veterinária. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal da Bahia. Escola de Medicina Veterinária. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Universidade Federal da Bahia. Escola de Medicina Veterinária. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Doenças Tropicais. INCT – DT. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biointervenção. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Doenças Tropicais. INCT – DT. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.subject.enCanine infectiousnesspt_BR
dc.subject.enParasite loadpt_BR
dc.subject.enXenodiagnosispt_BR
Appears in Collections:IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Borja LS Parasite load in the....pdf745.04 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInGoogle BookmarksBibTex Format mendeley Endnote DiggMySpace

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.