Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/20140
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dc.contributor.authorLima, Dinair Couto
dc.contributor.authorMadec, Yoann
dc.contributor.authorBersot, Maria Ignez
dc.contributor.authorCampos, Stephanie Silva
dc.contributor.authorMotta, Monique de Albuquerque
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Flávia Barreto dos
dc.contributor.authorVazeille, Marie
dc.contributor.authorVasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, Ricardo Lourenço de
dc.contributor.authorFailloux, Anna-Bella
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T16:25:05Z
dc.date.available2017-07-18T16:25:05Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationLIMA, Dinair Couto; et al. Potential risk of re-emergence of urban transmission of Yellow Fever virus in Brazil facilitated by competent Aedes populations. Scientific Reports, v.7:4848, 12p, July 2017.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/20140
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rightsopen access
dc.subject.otherVírus da Febre Amarela
dc.subject.otherAedes Aegypti
dc.subject.othertransmissão urbana
dc.subject.otherRessurgimento
dc.subject.otherPotencial risco
dc.titlePotential risk of re-emergence of urban transmission of Yellow Fever virus in Brazil facilitated by competent Aedes populations
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-05186-3
dc.description.abstractenYellow fever virus (YFV) causing a deadly viral disease is transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. In Brazil, YFV is restricted to a forest cycle maintained between non-human primates and forest-canopy mosquitoes, where humans can be tangentially infected. Since late 2016, a growing number of human cases have been reported in Southeastern Brazil at the gates of the most populated areas of South America, the Atlantic coast, with Rio de Janeiro state hosting nearly 16 million people. We showed that the anthropophilic mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus as well as the YFV-enzootic mosquitoes Haemagogus leucocelaenus and Sabethes albiprivus from the YFV-free region of the Atlantic coast were highly susceptible to American and African YFV strains. Therefore, the risk of reemergence of urban YFV epidemics in South America is major with a virus introduced either from a forest cycle or by a traveler returning from the YFV-endemic region of Africa.
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil / Institut Pasteur. Arboviruses and Insect Vectors. Paris, France.
dc.creator.affilliationInstitut Pasteur. Epidemiology of infectious diseases. Paris, France.
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
dc.creator.affilliationInstitut Pasteur. Arboviruses and Insect Vectors. Paris, France.
dc.creator.affilliationInstituto Evandro Chagas. Belém, PA, Brasil
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
dc.creator.affilliationInstitut Pasteur. Arboviruses and Insect Vectors. Paris, France.
dc.subject.enYellow Fever virus
dc.subject.enBrazil
dc.subject.enAedes
dc.subject.enurban transmission
dc.subject.ene-emergence
dc.subject.enPotential risk
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