Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/26248
Title: The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection
Authors: Souza, Andréa Pereira de
Sieberg, Ryan
Li, Hua
Cahill, Hannah R.
Zhao, Dazhi
Araujo-Jorge, Tania C.
Tanowitz, Herbert B.
Jelicks, Linda A.
Affilliation: Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Physiology & Biopphysics. Bronx, NY, USA / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Inovações em Terapias, Ensino e Bioprodutos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Physiology & Biophysics. Bronx, NY, USA.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Physiology & Biophysics. Bronx, NY, USA.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Physiology & Biophysics. Bronx, NY, USA.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Pathology (Division of Parasitology) and Medicine. Bronx, NY, USA.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Inovações em Terapias, Ensino e Bioprodutos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Pathology (Division of Parasitology) and Medicine. Bronx, NY, USA.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Department of Physiology & Biophysics. Bronx, NY, USA.
Abstract: Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes megasyndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans and animals. In the present study, we employed magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively monitor the effect of selenium supplementation on alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi-infected mice. CD1 mice infected with T. cruzi (Brazil strain) exhibited dilatation of the intestines similar to that we recently reported in infected C57Bl/6 mice. The average intestine lumen diameter increased by 65% and the increase was reduced to 29% in mice supplemented with 2 ppm selenium in the drinking water. When supplemented with 3 ppm selenium in chow the lumen diameter was also significantly reduced although the difference between the infected and infected supplemented mice was smaller. Intestinal motility in infected mice fed with selenium-enriched chow was increased compared with infected mice fed with normal unsupplemented chow and was not significantly different from intestinal motility in uninfected mice. We suggest that Se may be used to modulate the inflammatory, immunological, and/or antioxidant responses involved in intestinal disturbances caused by T. cruzi infection.
Keywords: Trypanosoma cruzi
Chagas Disease
intestinal motility
Infection
selenium
keywords: Trypanosoma cruzi
Doença de Chagas
Infecção
motilidade intestinal
Selênio
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Springer Verlag (Germany)
Citation: SOUZA, Andréa Pereira de; et al. The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection. Parasitol Res. v..106, n.6, p.1293–1298, May 2010.
DOI: 10.1007/s00436-010-1794-1
ISSN: 0932-0113
Copyright: restricted access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

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