Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/26526
Title: Effect of urban vs. rural residence on the association between atopy and wheeze in Latin America: findings from a case-control analysis
Authors: Endara, P.
Vaca, M.
Platts-Mills, T. A. E.
Workman, L.
Chico, M. E.
Barreto, Maurício Lima
Rodrigues, Laura Cunha
Cooper, P. J.
Affilliation: Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud. Universidad San Francisco de Quito. Quito, Ecuador / Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS. Quininde, Ecuador.
Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS. Quininde, Ecuador.
University of Virginia. Asthma and Allergic Diseases Center. Charlottesville, VA, USA.
University of Virginia. Asthma and Allergic Diseases Center. Charlottesville, VA, USA.
Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS. Quininde, Ecuador.
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Instituto de Saúde Coletiva. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology. London, UK.
Colegio de Ciencias de la Salud. Universidad San Francisco de Quito. Quito, Ecuador / Laboratorio de Investigaciones FEPIS. Quininde, Ecuador / Pontificia Universidad Cat olica del Ecuador. Centro de investigacion en Enfermedades Infecciosas. Quito, Ecuador / St George’s University of London. Institute of Infection and Immunity. London.
Abstract: The association between atopy and asthma is attenuated in non-affluent populations, an effect that may be explained by childhood infections such as geohelminths. Objective To investigate the association between atopy and wheeze in schoolchildren living in urban and rural areas of Ecuador and examine the effects of geohelminths on this association. Methods We performed nested case–control studies among comparable populations of schoolchildren living in rural communities and urban neighbourhoods in the Province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador. We detected geohelminths in stool samples, measured recent wheeze and environmental exposures by parental questionnaire, and atopy by specific IgE (sIgE) and skin prick test (SPT) reactivity to aeroallergens. Results Atopy, particularly sIgE to house dust mite (HDM), was more strongly associated with recent wheeze in urban than rural schoolchildren: (urban, adj. OR 5.19, 95% CI 3.37–8.00, P < 0.0001; rural, adj. OR 1.81, 95%CI 1.09–2.99, P = 0.02; interaction, P < 0.001). The population fractions of wheeze attributable to atopy were approximately two-fold greater in urban schoolchildren: SPT to any allergen (urban 23.5% vs. rural 10.1%), SPT to HDM (urban 18.5% vs. rural 9.6%), and anti-HDM IgE (urban 26.5% vs. rural 10.5%), while anti-Ascaris IgE was related to wheeze in a high proportion of rural (49.7%) and urban (35.4%) children. The association between atopy and recent wheeze was attenuated by markers of geohelminth infections. Conclusions Our data suggest that urban residence modifies the association between HDM atopy and recent wheeze, and this effect is explained partly by geohelminth infections.
Keywords: Atopy
Geohelminths
House dust mite
Latin America
Tropics
Urban
Wheeze
keywords: Atopia
Geohelmintos
Ácaro da poeira domiciliar
América Latina
Trópicos
Urbano
Chiado
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Wiley
Citation: ENDARA, P. et al. Effect of urban vs. rural residence on the association between atopy and wheeze in Latin America: findings from a case-control analysis. Clinical & Experimental Allergy, v. 45, p. 438-447, 2015.
Description: Barreto, Mauricio Lima. Fiundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. “Documento produzido em parceria ou por autor vinculado à Fiocruz, mas não consta à informação no documento”.
DOI: 10.1111/cea.12399
ISSN: 0954-7894
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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