Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/2735
Title: The game of contacts: estimating the social visibility of groups
Authors: Salganik, Matthew J.
Mello, Maeve Brito de
Abdo, Alexandre H.
Bertoni, Neilane
Fazito, Dimitri
Bastos, Francisco Inácio Pinkusfeld Monteiro
Affilliation: Princeton University. Department of Sociology and Office of Population Research. Princeton, NJ, USA.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto de Comunicação e Informação Científica e Tecnológica em Saúde. Laboratório de Informação em Saúde.Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Universidade de São Paulo. Departamento de Física. São Paulo, SP, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Departamento de Demografia do Centro de Desenvolvimento e Planejamento Regional. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto de Comunicação e Informação Científica e Tecnológica em Saúde. Laboratório de Informação em Saúde.Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fulbright/Capes Visiting Scholar, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
Abstract: Estimating the sizes of hard-to-count populations is a challenging and important problem that occurs frequently in social science, public health, and public policy. This problem is particularly pressing in HIV/AIDS research because estimates of the sizes of the most at-risk populations—illicit drug users, men who have sex with men, and sex workers—are needed for designing, evaluating, and funding programs to curb the spread of the disease. A promising new approach in this area is the network scale-up method, which uses information about the personal networks of respondents to make population size estimates. However, if the target population has low social visibility, as is likely to be the case in HIV/AIDS research, scale-up estimates will be too low. In this paper we develop a game-like activity that we call the game of contacts in order to estimate the social visibility of groups, and report results from a study of heavy drug users in Curitiba, Brazil (n = 294). The game produced estimates of social visibility that were consistent with qualitative expectations but of surprising magnitude. Further, a number of checks suggest that the data are high-quality. While motivated by the specific problem of population size estimation, our method could be used by researchers more broadly and adds to long-standing efforts to combine the richness of social network analysis with the power and scale of sample surveys.
Keywords: Network Scale-up Method
Hidden Populations
Network Sampling
HIV/AIDS Disease Surveillance
Information Flow
keywords: Método Network Scale-up
Populações Ocultas
Amostragem de Rede
Vigilância da Doença HIV/AIDS
Fluxo de Informações
DeCS: Estimativas de População
Projeções de População
Amostragem
HIV
Epidemiologia
Disseminação de Informação
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: SALGANIK, Matthew J. et al. The game of contacts: estimating the social visibility of groups. Social Networks, v. 33, n. 1, p.70-78, 2011.
DOI: 10.1016/j.socnet.2010.10.006
ISSN: 0378-8733
Copyright: restricted access
Appears in Collections:ICICT - Artigos de Periódicos

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