Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/29928
Title: Lower Richness of Small Wild Mammal Species and Chagas Disease Risk
Authors: Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas
Roque, Andre´ Luiz Rodrigues
Lima, Valdirene dos Santos
Monteiro, Kerla Joeline Lima
Otaviano, Joel Carlos Rodrigues
Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira da
Jansen, Ana Maria
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sergio Arouca. Laboratório de Métodos Quantitativos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Instituto Militar de Engenharia. Laboratório de Cartografia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia de Tripanosomatídeos. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Abstract: A new epidemiological scenario involving the oral transmission of Chagas disease, mainly in the Amazon basin, requires innovative control measures. Geospatial analyses of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle in the wild mammals have been scarce. We applied interpolation and map algebra methods to evaluate mammalian fauna variables related to small wild mammals and the T. cruzi infection pattern in dogs to identify hotspot areas of transmission. We also evaluated the use of dogs as sentinels of epidemiological risk of Chagas disease. Dogs (n = 649) were examined by two parasitological and three distinct serological assays. kDNA amplification was performed in patent infections, although the infection was mainly sub-patent in dogs. The distribution of T. cruzi infection in dogs was not homogeneous, ranging from 11–89% in different localities. The interpolation method and map algebra were employed to test the associations between the lower richness in mammal species and the risk of exposure of dogs to T. cruzi infection. Geospatial analysis indicated that the reduction of the mammal fauna (richness and abundance) was associated with higher parasitemia in small wild mammals and higher exposure of dogs to infection. A Generalized Linear Model (GLM) demonstrated that species richness and positive hemocultures in wild mammals were associated with T. cruzi infection in dogs. Domestic canine infection rates differed significantly between areas with and without Chagas disease outbreaks (Chi-squared test). Geospatial analysis by interpolation and map algebra methods proved to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of areas of T. cruzi transmission. Dog infection was shown to not only be an efficient indicator of reduction of wild mammalian fauna richness but to also act as a signal for the presence of small wild mammals with high parasitemia. The lower richness of small mammal species is discussed as a risk factor for the re-emergence of Chagas disease.
Keywords: Chagas Disease
Small Wild Mammal
Brazil
keywords: Doença de Chagas
pequenos mamíferos selvagens
Brasil
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: XAVIER, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; et al. Lower Richness of Small Wild Mammal Species and Chagas Disease Risk. PLoS Negl Trop Dis , v.6, n.5, e1647, 11p, May 2012.
ISSN: 1935-2727
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

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