Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/35508
Title: Variation in the prevalence and abundance of acanthocephalans in brown-nosed coatis Nasua nasua and crab-eating foxes Cerdocyon thous in the Brazilian Pantanal
Authors: Gomes, A. P. N.
Maldonado Júnior, A.
Bianchi, R. C.
Souza, J. G. R.
D'Andrea, P. S.
Gompper, M. E.
Olifiers, N.
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia e Parasitologia de Mamíferos Silvestre Reservatórios. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Parasitária. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia e Parasitologia de Mamíferos Silvestre Reservatórios. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho. Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinária. Departamento de Biologia Aplicada à Agropecuária. Laboratório de Ecologia de Mamíferos. Jaboticabal, SP, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia e Parasitologia de Mamíferos Silvestre Reservatórios. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia e Parasitologia de Mamíferos Silvestre Reservatórios. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
University of Missouri. School of Natural Resources. Columbia, USA.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Biologia e Parasitologia de Mamíferos Silvestre Reservatórios. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Veiga de Almeida. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Abstract: Host infection by parasites is influenced by an array of factors, including host and environmental features. We investigated the relationship between host sex, body size and age, as well as seasonality on infection patterns by acanthocephalan in coatis (Procyonidae: Nasua nasua) and in crab-eating foxes (Canidae: Cerdocyon thous) from the Brazilian Pantanal wetlands. Between 2006 and 2009, we collected faecal samples from these hosts and analyzed for the presence of acanthocephalan eggs. Prevalence, abundance and intensity of eggs of acanthocephalans were calculated. Egg abundance was analyzed using generalized linear models (GLM) with a negative binomial distribution and models were compared by Akaike criteria to verify the effect of biotic and abiotic factors. Prevalence of acanthocephalans was higher in the wet season in both host species but did not differ between host sexes; however, adult crab-eating foxes showed higher prevalence of acanthocephalan eggs than juveniles. In contrast, prevalence of acanthocephalan eggs found in coatis was higher in coati juveniles than in adults. Host age, season and maximum temperature were the top predictors of abundance of acanthocephalan eggs in crab-eating foxes whereas season and host sex were predictors of egg abundance in coatis. The importance of seasonality for abundance of acanthocephalan was clear for both host species. The influence of host-related attributes, however, varied by host species, with host gender and host age being important factors associated with prevalence and parasite loads.
Abstract: Host infection by parasites is influenced by an array of factors, including host and environmental features. We investigated the relationship between host sex, body size and age, as well as seasonality on infection patterns by acanthocephalan in coatis (Procyonidae: Nasua nasua) and in crab-eating foxes (Canidae: Cerdocyon thous ) from the Brazilian Pantanal wetlands. Between 2006 and 2009, we collected faecal samples from these hosts and analyzed for the presence of acanthocephalan eggs. Prevalence, abundance and intensity of eggs of acanthocephalans were calculated. Egg abundance was analyzed using generalized linear models (GLM) with a negative binomial distribution and models were compared by Akaike criteria to verify the effect of biotic and abiotic factors. Prevalence of acanthocephalans was higher in the wet season in both host species but did not differ between host sexes; however, adult crab-eating foxes showed higher prevalence of acanthocephalan eggs than juveniles. In contrast, prevalence of acanthocephalan eggs found in coatis was higher in coati juveniles than in adults. Host age, season and maximum temperature were the top predictors of abundance of acanthocephalan eggs in crab-eating foxes whereas season and host sex were predictors of egg abundance in coatis. The importance of seasonality for abundance of acanthocephalan was clear for both host species. The influence of host-related attributes, however, varied by host species, with host gender and host age being important factors associated with prevalence and parasite loads.
Keywords: Acanthocephala
Carnivora
Disease ecology
Helminth
Pantanal
keywords: Acanthocephala
Carnívora
Ecologia de doença
Helminto
Pantanal
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Instituto Internacional de Ecologia
Citation: GOMES, A. P. N. et al. Variation in the prevalence and abundance of acanthocephalans in brown-nosed coatis Nasua nasua and crab-eating foxes Cerdocyon thous in the Brazilian Pantanal. Brazilian Journal of Biology, v. 79, n. 3, p. 533-542, 2019.
DOI: 10.1590/1519-6984.187881
ISSN: 1519-6984
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

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