Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/36393
Title: Genotype variation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) tolerance to Fe toxicity might be linked to root cell wall lignification
Authors: Stein, Ricardo José
Duarte, Guilherme Leitão
Scheunemann, Lívia
Spohr, Marta Gomes
Araújo Júnior, Artur Teixeira de
Ricachenevsky, Felipe Klein
Rosa, Luis Mauro Gonçalves
Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin
Santos, Rinaldo Pires dos
Fett, Janette Palma
Affilliation: Faculdade Murialdo. Caxias do Sul, RS, Brasil.
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Centro de Biotecnologia. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Instituto de Biociências. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Instituto de Biociências. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Centro de Biotecnologia. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. Departamento de Biologia. Santa Maria, RS, Brasil.
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Faculdade de Agronomia. Departamento de Plantas Forrageiras e Agrometeorologia. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Carlos Chagas. Curitiba, PR, Brasil.
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Centro de Biotecnologia. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. / Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Instituto de Biociências. Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.
Abstract: Iron (Fe) is an essential element to plants, but can be harmful if accumulated to toxic concentrations. Fe toxicity can be a major nutritional disorder in rice (Oryza sativa) when cultivated under waterlogged conditions, as a result of excessive Fe solubilization of in the soil. However, little is known about the basis of Fe toxicity and tolerance at both physiological and molecular level. To identify mechanisms and potential candidate genes for Fe tolerance in rice, we comparatively analyzed the effects of excess Fe on two cultivars with distinct tolerance to Fe toxicity, EPAGRI 108 (tolerant) and BR-IRGA 409 (susceptible). After excess Fe treatment, BR-IRGA 409 plants showed reduced biomass and photosynthetic parameters, compared to EPAGRI 108. EPAGRI 108 plants accumulated lower amounts of Fe in both shoots and roots compared to BR-IRGA 409. We conducted transcriptomic analyses of roots from susceptible and tolerant plants under control and excess Fe conditions. We found 423 up-regulated and 92 down-regulated genes in the susceptible cultivar, and 42 up-regulated and 305 down-regulated genes in the tolerant one. We observed striking differences in root gene expression profiles following exposure to excess Fe: the two cultivars showed no genes regulated in the same way (up or down in both), and 264 genes were oppositely regulated in both cultivars. Plants from the susceptible cultivar showed down-regulation of known Fe uptake-related genes, indicating that plants are actively decreasing Fe acquisition. On the other hand, plants from the tolerant cultivar showed up-regulation of genes involved in root cell wall biosynthesis and lignification. We confirmed that the tolerant cultivar has increased lignification in the outer layers of the cortex and in the vascular bundle compared to the susceptible cultivar, suggesting that the capacity to avoid excessive Fe uptake could rely in root cell wall remodeling. Moreover, we showed that increased lignin concentrations in roots might be linked to Fe tolerance in other rice cultivars, suggesting that a similar mechanism might operate in multiple genotypes. Our results indicate that changes in root cell wall and Fe permeability might be related to Fe toxicity tolerance in rice natural variation.
Keywords: Iron
Lignin
Plant Roots
Gene Expression Profiling
rice
Keywords in spanish: Hierro
Raíces de Plantas
Perfilación de la Expresión Génica
keywords: Oryza sativa
DeCS: Ferro
Lignina
Raízes de Plantas
Perfilação da Expressão Gênica
arroz
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Frontiers in Plant Science
Citation: STEIN, Ricardo José et al. Genotype variation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) tolerance to fe toxicity might be linked to root cell wall lignification. Frontiers in Plant Science, v. 10, n. 746, p. 1–20, 2019.
DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2019.00746
ISSN: 1664-462X
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:PR - ICC - Artigos de Periódicos

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