Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/46124
Title: Can Climate and Environmental Factors Putatively Increase SARS-Cov2 Transmission Risks?
Authors: Rangel, Elizabeth Ferreira
Afonso, Margarete Martins dos Santos
Sotero-Martins, Adriana
Campos, Aline
Coelho, Wagner Nazário
Gama, Eric Lopes da
Flores, Geane Lopes
Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça
Aguiar-Oliveira, Maria de Lourdes
Affilliation: Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. National Institute of Science and Technology on Climate Change. Interdisciplinary Entomological Surveillance Laboratory in Diptera and Hemiptera. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. National Institute of Science and Technology on Climate Change. Interdisciplinary Entomological Surveillance Laboratory in Diptera and Hemiptera. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. National School of Public Health Sergio Arouca. Department of Sanitation and Environmental Health. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Department of Health, State Center for Health Surveillance. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. National School of Public Health Sergio Arouca. Department of Sanitation and Environmental Health. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Respiratory Viruses and Measles. National Reference Laboratory for Influenza and COVID-19 for the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH) and World Health Organization. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Respiratory Viruses and Measles. National Reference Laboratory for Influenza and COVID-19 for the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH) and World Health Organization. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Respiratory Viruses and Measles. National Reference Laboratory for Influenza and COVID-19 for the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH) and World Health Organization. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Oswaldo Cruz Institute. Laboratory of Respiratory Viruses and Measles. National Reference Laboratory for Influenza and COVID-19 for the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH) and World Health Organization. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
Abstract: After the identification of the first SARS-COV-2 infected cases in China, the virus was rapidly disseminated among the distinct continents and the COVID-19 pandemics was announced by the WHO in March 2020. Over time, the epidemiological sceneries varied among countries, according to the adopted mitigation measures and epidemic phase. Recently, a recrudescence of the epidemics has been observed in distinct countries. SARSCoV-2 can be transmitted by direct or indirect contact. The viral RNA has been detected in stool and other clinical specimens from infected patients and a putative fecal-oral transmission has been argued. Viruses are shed in human excreta, further disposed into the sewerage system or into the environment, in poor sanitation settings. Thus, SARS-CoV-2 RNA has been regularly detected in wastewater and surface water impacted by the direct discharge of sewage. Some studies have reported an association between climatic parameters and an increase in COVID-19 incidence. However, conclusive evidence based in full seasons is needed so far. This mini-review briefly discusses the putative role of climate and environmental factors on SARS-CoV-2 exposure, transmission and circulation patterns. Moreover, some additional challenges in middle and low-income settings are highlighted. Efforts must be driven to categorically understand the relationships between SARS-CoV-2 infection, circulation patterns and climate parameters, as the putative implications of viral persistence and viability in distinct environmental matrices. This information is crucial for COVID-19 control and prevention, especially in middle and low-income settings, already wedged by social inequality, inadequate sanitation and deficient healthcare admission.
Keywords: SARS-COV-2
Transmission
COVID-19
Climate
Wastewater
Surface water
Public health
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: Biomedgrid
Citation: RANGEL, Elizabeth Ferreira et al. Can Climate and Environmental Factors Putatively Increase SARS-Cov2 Transmission Risks? American Journal of Biomedical Science & Research, p. 294-299, January 08, 2021.
DOI: 10.34297/AJBSR.2021.11.001647
ISSN: 2642-1747
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos
ENSP - Artigos de Periódicos
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