Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/8822
Title: Influence of Deforestation, Logging, and Fire on Malaria in the Brazilian Amazon
Authors: Hahn, Micah B.
Gangnon, Ronald E.
Barcellos, Christovam
Asner, Gregory P.
Patz, Jonathan A.
Affilliation: Nelson Institute. Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States of America
Department of Population Health Sciences. School of Medicine and Public Health. Madison, WI, United States of America
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto de Comunicação e Informação Científica e Tecnológica em Saúde. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science. Stanford University. California, CA, United States of America
Nelson Institute. Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States of America/ Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health. Madison, WI, United States of America
Abstract: Malaria is a significant public health threat in the Brazilian Amazon. Previous research has shown that deforestation creates breeding sites for the main malaria vector in Brazil, Anopheles darlingi, but the influence of selective logging, forest fires, and road construction on malaria risk has not been assessed. To understand these impacts, we constructed a negative binomial model of malaria counts at the municipality level controlling for human population and social and environmental risk factors. Both paved and unpaved roadways and fire zones in a municipality increased malaria risk. Within the timber production states where 90% of deforestation has occurred, compared with areas without selective logging, municipalities where 0–7% of the remaining forests were selectively logged had the highest malaria risk (1.72, 95% CI 1.18–2.51), and areas with higher rates of selective logging had the lowest risk (0.39, 95% CI 0.23–0.67). We show that roads, forest fires, and selective logging are previously unrecognized risk factors for malaria in the Brazilian Amazon and highlight the need for regulation and monitoring of sub-canopy forest disturbance
DeCS: Malária
Anopheles
Insetos Vetores/patogenicidade
Desmatamento
Incêndios Florestais
Brasil/ epidemiologia
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: HAHN, M. B et al. Influence of Deforestation, Logging, and Fire on Malaria in the Brazilian Amazon. Plos one, v.9, n1, p. 1-8, 2014
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085725
ISSN: 1932-6203
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:ICICT - Artigos de Periódicos

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