Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/9716
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dc.contributor.authorMenezes, Aleksandra Oliveira-
dc.contributor.authorRangel, Adriana Lanfredi-
dc.contributor.authorLanfredi, Reinalda Marisa-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-17T13:17:10Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-17T13:17:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationOLIVEIRA-MENEZES, A.; LANFREDI-RANGEL, A. LANFREDI, R. M. The first description of eggs in the male reproductive system of Physaloptera bispiculata (Nematoda: Spiruroidaea). Journal of Helminthology, v. 85, n. 2, p. 142-145, 2011.pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1475-2697-
dc.identifier.urihttp://arca.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/9716-
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.publisherCambridge University Presspt_BR
dc.rightsopen accesspt_BR
dc.titleThe first description of eggs in the male reproductive system of Physaloptera bispiculata (Nematoda: Spiruroidaea).pt_BR
dc.typeArticlept_BR
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0022149X10000374-
dc.description.abstractenPhysaloptera bispiculata (Nematoda: Spiruroidaea) is a parasite of Nectomys squamipes (Rodentia: Cricetidae), a water rat that only occurs in Brazil. Naturally infected rodents were captured in the municipality of Rio Bonito, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Adult P. bispiculata worms were collected, prepared and analysed by light and scanning electron microscopy. Under scanning electron microscopy, several eggs were seen glued by cement to the cloacal aperture. Light microscopy revealed that some male worms had an uncountable number of embryonated eggs in the ejaculatory duct, cloaca and also in the posterior portion of the intestine. The probable explanation is that the eggs developing in the female uterus are pumped by the female or sucked by the male to the cloacal opening and from this point to the intestine and ejaculatory duct. The male probably does not have the ability to expel the eggs and for this reason a large number were found in these organs. On the other hand, this could be an important adaptation for the parasite, i.e. male worms expelled by the host can carry a large number of eggs and spread them to intermediate hosts when ingested by these hosts. As far as we know this is the first record of a physalopterid nematode harbouring eggs in the cloacal region, ejaculatory duct or intestine.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho. Laboratório de Biologia de Helmintos Otto Wucherer. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationFundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Biologia de Protozoários e Unidade de Microscopia Eletrônica. Salvador, BA, Brasilpt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho. Laboratório de Biologia de Helmintos Otto Wucherer. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasilpt_BR
dc.subject.decsGenitália Masculina/anatomia & histologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsSpiruroidea/anatomia & histologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsZigoto/citologiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsAnimaispt_BR
dc.subject.decsBrasilpt_BR
dc.subject.decsMasculinopt_BR
dc.subject.decsFemininopt_BR
dc.subject.decsMicroscopiapt_BR
dc.subject.decsSigmodontinae/parasitologiapt_BR
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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