Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/10581
Title: Frequent House Invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Triatomines in a Suburban Area of Brazil
Authors: Ribeiro Junior, Gilmar José da Silva
Gonçalves, Rodrigo Gurgel
Reis, Renato Barbosa
Santos, Carlos Gustavo Silva dos
Amorim, Alekhine
Andrade, Sonia Gumes
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biologia Molecular. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Faculdade Ruy Barbosa DeVry. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Universidade de Brasília. Laboratório de Parasitologia Médica e Biologia de Vetores. Brasília, DF, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biologia Molecular. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Unifacs. Universidade Salvador. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biologia Molecular. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Secretaria da Saúde. Laboratório Central de Saúde Pública do Estado da Bahia. Laboratório de Entomologia. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Patologia e Biologia Molecular. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Abstract: Background The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses) of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212) of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%), marsupials (38%), ruminants (7%) and rodents (5%). The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-3.11). Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73).Conclusions/Significance The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists.
keywords: Trypanosoma cruzi
Doença de chagas
Doenças infecciosas
Triatoma
Triatomíneos
Infecção
Transmissão
População suburbana
Vigilância
Brasil
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: RIBEIRO JUNIOR, G. et al. Frequent house invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected triatomines in a suburban area of Brazil. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, v. 9, n. 4, p. e0003678, 2015.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003678
ISSN: 1935-2727
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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