Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/10882
Title: Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2012–2013
Authors: Meijer, Adam
Andrade, Helena Rebelo de
Correia, Vanessa
Besselaar, Terry
Drager-Dayal, Renu
Fry, Alicia
Gregory, Vicky
Gubareva, Larisa
Kageyama, Tsutomu
Lackenby, Angie
Lo, Janice
Odagiri, Takato
Pereyaslov, Dmitriy
Siqueira, Marilda M.
Takashita, Emi
Tashiro, Masato
Wang, Dayan
Wong, Sun
Zhang, Wenqing
Daniels, Rod S.
Hurt, Aeron C.
Affilliation: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment. Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Instituto Nacional de Saúde. Lisboa Portugal / Universidade de Lisboa. Faculdade de Farmácia. Lisboa, Portugal.
Instituto Nacional de Saúde. Lisboa Portugal / Universidade de Lisboa. Faculdade de Farmácia. Lisboa, Portugal.
World Health Organization. Global Influenza Programme. Geneva, Switzerland.
Public Health Laboratory Centre. Hong Kong, China.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atlanta. USA.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza. MRC-National Institute for Medical Research. London, UK.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atlanta. USA.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza.National Institute of Infectious Diseases. Tokyo. Japan.
Public Health England Colindale. London, United Kingdom.
Public Health Laboratory Centre. Hong Kong, China.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza.National Institute of Infectious Diseases. Tokyo. Japan.
World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Division of Communicable Diseases, Health Security, & Environment. Copenhagen, Denmark.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. WHO/NIC. Laboratório de Vírus Respiratório e Sarampo. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza.National Institute of Infectious Diseases. Tokyo. Japan.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza.National Institute of Infectious Diseases. Tokyo. Japan.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza,. Chinese National Influenza Center. National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Beijing, China.
Public Health Laboratory Centre. Hong Kong, China.
Public Health Laboratory Centre. Hong Kong, China.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza. MRC-National Institute for Medical Research. London, UK.
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza.Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity. Melbourne, Australia / University of Melbourne. Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Melbourne, Australia.
Abstract: Emergence of influenza viruses with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) is sporadic, often follows exposure to NAIs, but occasionally occurs in the absence of NAI pressure. The emergence and global spread in 2007/2008 of A(H1N1) influenza viruses showing clinical resistance to oseltamivir due to neuraminidase (NA) H275Y substitution, in the absence of drug pressure, warrants continued vigilance and monitoring for similar viruses. Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 11,387 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres (NIC) between May 2012 and May 2013 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. The data were evaluated using normalized IC50 fold-changes rather than raw IC50 data. Nearly 90% of the 11,387 viruses were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Only 0.2% (n = 27) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, usually oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n = 39) showed reduced inhibition (RI). NA sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n = 3661), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n = 18), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n = 3) or NA R292K (n = 1) and B/Victoria-lineage with NA H273Y (n = 2); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Overall, approximately 99% of circulating viruses tested during the 2012–2013 period were sensitive to all four NAIs. Consequently, these drugs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections.
Keywords: Influenza virus
Antiviral resistance
Neuraminidase inhibitors
Oseltamivir
Global analysis
Normalization using fold-change data
DeCS: Oseltamivir
Influenza humana
Neuraminidase
esistência a Medicamentos
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: MEIJER, Adam et al. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2012-2013. Antiviral Research, v. 110, p. 31-41, 2014.
DOI: 10.1016/j.antiviral.2014.07.001
ISSN: 0166-3542
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
marilda_siqueira2etal_IOC_2014.pdf498.21 kBAdobe PDFView/Open



FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInGoogle BookmarksBibTex Format mendeley Endnote DiggMySpace

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.