Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/11727
Title: She’s a femme fatale: low-density larval development produces good disease vectors
Authors: Juliano, Steven A.
Ribeiro, Gabriel Sylvestre
Freitas, Rafael Maciel de
Castro, Márcia G.
Codeço, Claudia
Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço de
Lounibos, L. Philip
Affilliation: Illinois State University. School of Biological Science. Normal, IL, USA.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Programa de Computação Científica-Fiocruz. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
University of Florida. Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory. Gainesville, FL, USA.
Abstract: Two hypotheses for how conditions for larval mosquitoes affect vectorial capacity make opposite predictions about the relationship of adult size and frequency of infection with vector-borne pathogens. Competition among larvae produces small adult females. The competition-susceptibility hypothesis postulates that small females are more susceptible to infection and predicts frequency of infection should decrease with size. The competition-longevity hypothesis postulates that small females have lower longevity and lower probability of becoming competent to transmit the pathogen and thus predicts frequency of infection should increase with size. We tested these hypotheses for Aedes aegypti in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, during a dengue outbreak. In the laboratory, longevity increases with size, then decreases at the largest sizes. For field-collected females, generalised linear mixed model comparisons showed that a model with a linear increase of frequency of dengue with size produced the best Akaike’s information criterion with a correction for small sample sizes (AICc). Consensus prediction of three competing models indicated that frequency of infection increases monotonically with female size, consistent with the competition-longevity hypothesis. Site frequency of infection was not significantly related to site mean size of females. Thus, our data indicate that uncrowded, low competition conditions for larvae produce the females that are most likely to be important vectors of dengue. More generally, ecological conditions, particularly crowding and intraspecific competition among larvae, are likely to affect vector-borne pathogen transmission in nature, in this case via effects on longevity of resulting adults. Heterogeneity among individual vectors in likelihood of infection is a generally important outcome of ecological conditions impacting vectors as larvae.
Keywords: Dengue
Aedes Aegypti
Competition
Adult size
Longevity
Trans-stadial effects
keywords: Rio de Janeiro
DeCS: Aedes
Dengue
Patógenos Transmitidos pelo Sangue
Longevidade
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
Citation: JULIANO, Steven A.; She’s a femme fatale: low-density larval development produces good disease vectors. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz, v.109, n.8, p.1070-1077, Dec. 2014.
ISSN: 1678-8060
10.1590/0074-02760140455
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

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