Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/12082
Title: Hypertension in a Brazilian Urban Slum Population
Authors: Unger, Alon
Felzemburgh, Ridalva Dias Martins
Snyder, Robert E
Ribeiro, Guilherme de Sousa
Mohr, Sharif
Costa, Vinícius B. A
Melendez, Astrid X. T. O
Reis, Renato Barbosa
Santana, Francisco S
Riley, Lee Woodland
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Ko, Albert Icksang
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
University of California. School of Public Health. Divisions of Infectious Disease and Vaccinology, and Epidemiology. Berkeley, CA, USA
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Universidade Federal da Bahia. Instituto de Saúde Coletiva. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
University of California. School of Public Health. Divisions of Infectious Disease and Vaccinology, and Epidemiology. Berkeley, CA, USA
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Yale University. School of Public Health. Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. New Haven, USA
Abstract: Low- and middle-income countries account for the majority of hypertension disease burden. However, little is known about the distribution of this illness within subpopulations of these countries, particularly among those who live in urban informal settlements. A cross-sectional hypertension survey was conducted in 2003 among 5649 adult residents of a slum settlement in the city of Salvador, Brazil. Hypertension was defined as either an elevated arterial systolic (≥140 mmHg) or diastolic (≥90 mmHg) blood pressure. Sex-specific multivariable models of systolic blood pressure were constructed to identify factors associated with elevated blood pressure. The prevalence of hypertension in the population 18 years and older was 21 % (1162/5649). Men had 1.2 times the risk of hypertension compared with women (95 % confidence intervals (CI), 1.05, 1.36). Increasing age and lack of any schooling, particularly for women, were also significantly associated with elevated blood pressure (pG0.05). There was also a direct association between men who were black and an elevated blood pressure. Among those who were hypertensive, 65.5 % were aware of their condition, and only 36.3 % of those aware were actively using anti-hypertensive medications. Men were less likely to be aware of their diagnosis or to use medications (pG0.01 for both) than women. The prevalence of hypertension in this slum community was lower than reported frequencies in the non-slum population of Brazil and Salvador, yet both disease awareness and treatment frequency were low. Further research on hypertension and other chronic non-communicable diseases in slum populations is urgently needed to guide prevention and treatment efforts in this growing population.
Keywords: Hypertension
Non-communicable disease
Urban slum
Prevalence
Brazil
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Citation: UNGER, A. et al. Hypertension in a brazilian urban slum population. Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, v. 92, n. 2, p.446-459, 2015.
DOI: 10.1007/s11524-015-9956-1
ISSN: 1099-3460
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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