Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/13877
Title: The relative contribution of immigration or local increase for persistence of urban schistosomiasis in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil
Authors: Blanton, Ronald Edward
Barbosa, Lúcio Macedo
Reis, Eliana Almeida Gomes
Carmo, Theomira Mauadie de Azevedo
Santos, Cláudio R. A. dos
Costa, Jackson Mauricio Lopes
Aminu, Peace T
Blank, Walter A
Reis, Renato Barbosa
Guimarães, Isabel Cristina
Silva, Luciano Kalabric
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Affilliation: Centre for Global Health and Diseases. Case Western Reserve University. Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Centre for Global Health and Diseases. Case Western Reserve University. Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
Centre for Global Health and Diseases. Case Western Reserve University. Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / UNIFACS. Universidade Salvador. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Center for Control of Zoonoses. Municipal Secretariat of Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Universidade Federal da Bahia. Faculdade de Medicina. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Abstract: Urbanization is increasing across the globe, and diseases once considered rural can now be found in urban areas due to the migration of populations from rural endemic areas, local transmission within the city, or a combination of factors. We investigated the epidemiologic characteristics of urban immigrants and natives living in a neighborhood of Salvador, Brazil where there is a focus of transmission of Schistosoma mansoni. In a cross-sectional study, all inhabitants from 3 sections of the community were interviewed and examined. In order to determine the degree of parasite differentiation between immigrants and the native born, S. mansoni eggs from stools were genotyped for 15 microsatellite markers. The area received migrants from all over the state, but most infected children had never been outside of the city, and infected snails were present at water contact sites. Other epidemiologic features suggested immigration contributed little to the presence of infection. The intensity and prevalence of infection were the same for immigrants and natives when adjusted for age, and length of immigrant residence in the community was positively associated with prevalence of infection. The population structure of the parasites also supported that the contribution from immigration was small, since the host-to-host differentiation was no greater in the urban parasite population than a rural population with little distant immigration, and there had been little differentiation in the urban population over the past 7 years. Public health efforts should focus on eliminating local transmission, and once eliminated, reintroduction from distant migration is unlikely.
Keywords: Urban transmission of schistosomiasis
Rural disease
Parasite population
DeCS: Migração Internacional
Esquistossomose/epidemiologia
Adulto
Animais
Brasil/epidemiologia
Estudos Transversais
Fezes/parasitologia
Feminino
Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Prevalência
Schistosoma mansoni/genética
Esquistossomose/etiologia
População Urbana
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: BLANTON Ronald Edward et al. The relative contribution of immigration or local increase for persistence of urban schistosomiasis in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, v. 9, n. 3, p. 1-14, 2015.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003521
ISSN: 1935-2735
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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