Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/15946
Title: The correlation between ancestry and color in two cities of Northeast Brazil with contrasting ethnic compositions
Authors: Silva, Thiago Magalhães da
Rani, MR Sandhya
Costa, Gustavo Nunes de Oliveira
Figueiredo, Maria A.
Melo, Paulo S.
Nascimento, João F.
Molyneaux, Neil D.
Barreto, Maurício Lima
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Teixeira, Maria Glória
Blanton, Ronald E.
Affilliation: Federal University of Bahia. Institute for Collective Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Case Western Reserve University. Center for Global Health. Cleveland, OH, USA.
Federal University of Bahia. Institute for Collective Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Federal University of Bahia. Institute for Collective Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
State University Santa Cruz. Ilhéus, BA, Brasil.
State University Santa Cruz. Ilhéus, BA, Brasil.
Case Western Reserve University. Department of Genetics. Cleveland, OH, USA.
Federal University of Bahia. Institute for Collective Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Case Western Reserve University. Department of Genetics. Cleveland, OH, USA / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Federal University of Bahia. Institute for Collective Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil.
Case Western Reserve University. Center for Global Health. Cleveland, OH, USA.
Abstract: The degree of admixture in Brazil between historically isolated populations is complex and geographically variable. Studies differ as to what the genetic and phenotypic consequences of this mixing have been. In Northeastern Brazil, we enrolled 522 residents of Salvador and 620 of Fortaleza whose distributions of self-declared color were comparable to those in the national census. Using the program Structure and principal components analysis there was a clear correlation between biogeographic ancestry and categories of skin color. This correlation with African ancestry was stronger in Salvador (r=0.585; Po0.001) than in Fortaleza (r=0.236; Po0.001). In Fortaleza, although self-declared blacks had a greater proportion of European ancestry, they had more African ancestry than the other categories. When the populations were analyzed without pseudoancestors, as in some studies, the relationship of ‘race’ to genetic ancestry tended to diffuse or disappear. The inclusion of different African populations also influenced ancestry estimates. The percentage of unlinked ancestry informative markers in linkage disequilibrium, a measure of population structure, was 3–5 times higher in both Brazilian populations than expected by chance. We propose that certain methods, ascertainment bias and population history of the specific populations surveyed can result in failure to demonstrate a correlation between skin color and genetic ancestry. Population structure in Brazil has important implications for genetic studies, but genetic ancestry is irrelevant for how individuals are treated in society, their health, their income or their inclusion. These track more closely with perceived skin color than genetic ancestry.
Keywords: Skin Pigmentation
Censuses
Linkage Disequilibrium
Cities
Blacks
Brazil
Humans
keywords: Pigmentação da pele
Censos
Desequilíbrio de ligação
Cidades
Negros
Brasil
Humanos
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: SILVA, T. M. et al. The correlation between ancestry and color in two cities of Northeast Brazil with contrasting ethnic compositions. European Journal of Human Genetics, v. 23, p. 984–989, 2015.
DOI: 10.1038/ejhg.2014.215
ISSN: 1018-4813
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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