Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/31741
Title: Metabolome-wide association study of peripheral parasitemia in Plasmodium vivax malaria
Authors: Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo
Cordy, Regina Joice
Lacerda, Marcus V. G.
Salinas, Jorge L.
Monteiro, Wuelton M.
Melo, Gisely C.
Siqueira, André M.
Val, Fernando F.
Tran, ViLinh
Jones, Dean P.
Galinski, Mary R.
Li, Shuzhao
Affilliation: Emory University. School of Medicine. Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine. Atlanta, GA, USA / Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. International Center for Malaria Research, Education and Development. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Emory Vaccine Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Yerkes National Primate Research Center. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado. Gerência de Malária. Manaus, AM, Brasil / Universidade do Estado do Amazonas. Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde. Manaus, AM, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane. Manaus, AM, Brasil.
Emory University. Rollins School of Public Health. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado. Gerência de Malária. Manaus, AM, Brasil / Universidade do Estado do Amazonas. Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde. Manaus, AM, Brasil.
Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado. Gerência de Malária. Manaus, AM, Brasil / Universidade do Estado do Amazonas. Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde. Manaus, AM, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado. Gerência de Malária. Manaus, AM, Brasil / Universidade do Estado do Amazonas. Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde. Manaus, AM, Brasil
Emory University. School of Medicine. Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine. Atlanta, GA, USA / Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Department of Medicine. Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Emory University. School of Medicine. Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine. Atlanta, GA, USA / Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Department of Medicine. Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. International Center for Malaria Research, Education and Development. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Emory Vaccine Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Yerkes National Primate Research Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Department of Medicine. Division of Infectious Diseases. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Emory University. School of Medicine. Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine. Atlanta, GA, USA / Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center. Atlanta, GA, USA / Emory University. Department of Medicine. Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory. Atlanta, GA, USA.
Abstract: Plasmodium vivax is one of the leading causes of malaria worldwide. Infections with this parasite cause diverse clinical manifestations, and recent studies revealed that infections with P. vivax can result in severe and fatal disease. Despite these facts, biological traits of the host response and parasite metabolism during P. vivax malaria are still largely underexplored. Parasitemia is clearly related to progression and severity of malaria caused by P. falciparum, however the effects of parasitemia during infections with P. vivax are not well understood. Results: We conducted an exploratory study using a high-resolution metabolomics platform that uncovered significant associations between parasitemia levels and plasma metabolites from 150 patients with P. vivax malaria. Most plasma metabolites were inversely associated with higher levels of parasitemia. Top predicted metabolites are implicated into pathways of heme and lipid metabolism, which include biliverdin, bilirubin, palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine, phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine, oleic acid and omega-carboxytrinor-leukotriene B4. Conclusions: The abundance of several plasma metabolites varies according to the levels of parasitemia in patients with P. vivax malaria. Moreover, our data suggest that the host response and/or parasite survival might be affected by metabolites involved in the degradation of heme and metabolism of several lipids. Importantly, these data highlight metabolic pathways that may serve as targets for the development of new antimalarial compounds.
Keywords: Metabolomics
Host-pathogen interactions
Heme
Glycerophospholipid
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: GARDINASSI, Luiz Gustavo et al. Metabolometria-wide association study of peripheral parasitemia in Plasmodium vivax malaria. International Journal of Medical Microbiology. v. 307, n. 8, p. 533–541, Dec. 2017.
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2017.09.002
ISSN: 1438-4221
Copyright: restricted access
Appears in Collections:AM - ILMD - Artigos de Periódicos
INI - Artigos de Periódicos

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