Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/33306
Title: Paleoparasitological remains revealed by seven historic contexts from Place d Armes, Namur, Belgium
Authors: Rocha, Gino Chaves da
Harter- Lailheugue, Stephanie
Le Bailly, Matthieu
Araújo, Adauto
Ferreira, Luiz Fernando
Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués
Bouchet, Françoise
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sergio Arouca. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Université de Reims. Laboratoire de Paléoparasitologie. Reims, France.
Université de Reims. Laboratoire de Paléoparasitologie. Reims, France.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sergio Arouca. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sergio Arouca. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Departamento de Entomologia. Laboratório de Ixodides. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Université de Reims. Laboratoire de Paléoparasitologie. Reims, France.
Abstract: Human occupation for several centuries was recorded in the archaeological layers of "Place d'Armes", Namur, Belgium. Preventive archaeological excavations were carried out between 1996/1997 and seven historical strata were observed, from Gallo-Roman period up to Modern Times. Soil samples from cesspools, latrines, and structures-like were studied and revealed intestinal parasite eggs in the different archaeological contexts. Ascaris lumbricoides, A. suum, Trichuris trichiura, T. suis. Taenia sp., Fasciola hepatica, Diphyllobothrium sp., Capillaria sp. and Oxyuris equi eggs were found. Paleoparasitology confirmed the use of structures as latrines or cesspit as firstly supposed by the archaeologists. Medieval latrines were not only used for rejection of human excrements. The finding of Ascaris sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs may point to human's or wild swine's feces. Gallo-Roman people used to eat wild boar. Therefore, both A. suum and T. suis, or A. lumbricoides and T. trichuris, may be present, considering a swine carcass recovered into a cesspit. Careful sediment analysis may reveal its origin, although parasites of domestic animals can be found together with those of human's. Taenia sp. eggs identified in latrine samples indicate ingestion of uncooked beef with cysticercoid larvae. F. hepatica eggs suggest the ingestion of raw contaminated vegetables and Diphyllobothrium sp. eggs indicate contaminated fresh-water fish consumption. Ascaris sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs indicate fecal-oral infection by human and/or animal excrements.
Keywords: Paleoparasitology
Helminth eggs
Paleoepidemiology
Coprolites
Ancient diseases
keywords: Paleoparasitologia
Ovos de helmintos
Paleoepidemiologia
Coprólitos
Doenças antigas
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Citation: ROCHA, Gino Chaves da et al. Paleoparasitological remains revealed by seven historic contexts from Place d Armes, Namur, Belgium. Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, v. 101, Suppl. II, p.43-52, 2006.
DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02762006001000008
ISSN: 0074-0276
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:ENSP - Artigos de Periódicos
IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

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