Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/33706
Title: Capture of Alouatta guariba clamitans for the surveillance of sylvatic yellow fever and zoonotic malaria: Which is the best strategy in the tropical Atlantic Forest?
Authors: Abreu, Filipe Vieira Santos de
Santos, Edmilson dos
Gomes, Marcelo Quintela
Vargas, Waldemir Paixão
Passos, Pedro Henrique de Oliveira
Silva, Charles Nunes E.
Araújo, Pollyanna Cardoso
Pires, Jeferson Rocha
Romano, Alessandro Pecego Martins
Teixeira, Danilo Simonini
Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço de
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Mosquitos Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
Secretaria de Saúde do Rio Grande do Sul. Divisão de Vigilância Ambiental em Saúde. RS, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Mosquitos Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sergio Arouca. Departamento de Endemias Samuel Pessoa. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Departamento de Vigilância das Doenças Transmissíveis. Coordenação Geral de Vigilância das Doenças Transmissíveis. Brasília, DF, Brasil.
Secretaria Municipal de Saúde de Maceió. Unidade de Vigilância de Zoonoses. Maceió, AL, Brasil.
Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Departamento de Vigilância das Doenças Transmissíveis. Coordenação Geral de Vigilância das Doenças Transmissíveis. Brasília, DF, Brasil.
Universidade Estácio de Sá. Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. Departamento de Vigilância das Doenças Transmissíveis. Coordenação Geral de Vigilância das Doenças Transmissíveis. Brasília, DF, Brasil.
Universidade de Brasília. Faculdade de Agronomia e Veterinárias. Brasília, DF, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Mosquitos Transmissores de Hematozoários. Rio de Janeiro, RJ. Brasil.
Abstract: Howler monkey capture is an arduous and expensive task requiring trained and specialized professionals. We compared strategies and methods to most efficiently capture Alouatta guariba clamitans in remnants of the Atlantic Forest in Rio de Janeiro and its bordering states of Minas Gerais and São Paulo. We tested whether or not the success of expeditions in the forest with anesthetic darts, nets, and baited traps differed with and without the support of an information network, a contact chain built with key institutions and inhabitants to continuously monitor howler monkey presence. The influence of forest conditions (vegetation type and fragment size) upon darting success was also evaluated. We captured 24 free-living A. guariba clamitans. No howler monkey was caught with traps, probably due to the predominantly folivore feeding to high local plant diversity providing a great variety of food options. Captures based on an information network were significantly more efficient in terms of numbers of caught monkeys than without it. Captures with darts were considerably more efficient when performed in semideciduous forests and small forest fragments as opposed to ombrophilous forests or large woods. Although we walked great distances within the forest searching for howler monkeys, all but one animal were captured at the forest fringes. Hindrances to search and the darting method in the Atlantic Forest, for example, the steep terrain, high tree canopies, hunt pressure, and low A. guariba clamitans population density, were mitigated with the use of the information network in this monkey capture. Moreover, the information network enhanced the surveillance of zoonotic diseases, which howler monkeys and other nonhuman primates are reservoirs in Brazil, such as malaria and yellow fever.
Keywords: Anesthetic dart
Howler monkey
Information network
Trapping
keywords: Dardo anestésico
Rede de informação
Armadilha
DeCS: Alouatta
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Wiley
Citation: ABREU, Filipe Vieira Santos et al. Capture of Alouatta guariba clamitans for the surveillance of sylvatic yellow fever and zoonotic malaria: Which is the best strategy in the tropical Atlantic Forest?. Am. J. Primatol., p. 1-9, 2019.
DOI: 10.1002/ajp.23000
ISSN: 0275-2565
Copyright: restricted access
Appears in Collections:ENSP - Artigos de Periódicos
IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

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