Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/50746
Title: A Biosafety Level 2 Mouse Model for Studying Betacoronavirus- Induced Acute Lung Damage and Systemic Manifestations
Authors: Andrade, Ana Cláudia dos Santos Pereira
Silva, Gabriel Henrique Campolina
Queiroz Junior, Celso Martins
Oliveira, Leonardo Camilo de
Lacerda, Larisse de Souza Barbosa
Gaggino, Jordane Clarisse Pimenta
Souza, Filipe Resende Oliveira de
Chaves, Ian de Meira
Passos, Ingredy Beatriz
Teixeira, Danielle Cunha
Silva, Paloma Graziele Bittencourt
Valadão, Priscila Aparecida Costa
Oliveira, Leonardo Rossi
Antunes, Maisa Mota
Figueiredo, André Felipe Almeida
Wnuk, Natália Teixeira
Temerozo, Jairo R.
Ferreira, André Costa
Cramer, Allysson
Oliveira, Cleida Aparecida
Carvalho, Ricardo Durães
Arns, Clarice Weis
Guimarães, Pedro Pires Goulart
Costa, Guilherme Mattos Jardim
Menezes, Gustavo Batista de
Guatimosim, Cristina
Silva, Glauber Santos Ferreira da
Souza, Thiago Moreno L.
Barrioni, Breno Rocha
Pereira, Marivalda de Magalhães
Sousa, Lirlândia Pires de
Teixeira, Mauro Martins
Costa, Vivian Vasconcelos
Affilliation: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Microbiologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Pesquisa sobre o Timo. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Neuroimunomodulação. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico em Saúde. Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Inovação em Doenças de Populações Negligenciadas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Iguaçu. Laboratório de Pesquisas Pre-Clínicas. Nova Iguaçu, RJ, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Laboratório de Virologia. Campinas, SP, Brasil.
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Laboratório de Virologia. Campinas, SP, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Microbiologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Microbiologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Microbiologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Neuroimunomodulação. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Faculdade de Farmácia. Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Morfologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil / Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.
Abstract: The emergence of life-threatening zoonotic diseases caused by betacoronaviruses, including the ongoing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, has highlighted the need for developing preclinical models mirroring respiratory and systemic pathophysiological manifestations seen in infected humans. Here, we showed that C57BL/6J wild-type mice intranasally inoculated with the murine betacoronavirus murine hepatitis coronavirus 3 (MHV-3) develop a robust inflammatory response leading to acute lung injuries, including alveolar edema, hemorrhage, and fibrin thrombi. Although such histopathological changes seemed to resolve as the infection advanced, they efficiently impaired respiratory function, as the infected mice displayed restricted lung distention and increased respiratory frequency and ventilation. Following respiratory manifestation, the MHV-3 infection became systemic, and a high virus burden could be detected in multiple organs along with morphological changes. The systemic manifestation of MHV-3 infection was also marked by a sharp drop in the number of circulating platelets and lymphocytes, besides the augmented concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 beta (IL-1b), IL-6, IL-12, gamma interferon (IFN-g), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), thereby mirroring some clinical features observed in moderate and severe cases of COVID-19. Importantly, both respiratory and systemic changes triggered by MHV-3 infection were greatly prevented by blocking TNF signaling, either via genetic or pharmacologic approaches. In line with this, TNF blockage also diminished the infection- mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and virus replication of human epithelial lung cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Collectively, results show that MHV-3 respiratory infection leads to a large range of clinical manifestations in mice and may constitute an attractive, lower-cost, biosafety level 2 (BSL2) in vivo platform for evaluating the respiratory and multiorgan involvement of betacoronavirus infections. IMPORTANCE Mouse models have long been used as valuable in vivo platforms to investigate the pathogenesis of viral infections and effective countermeasures. The natural resistance of mice to the novel betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has launched a race toward the characterization of SARS-CoV-2 infection in other animals (e.g., hamsters, cats, ferrets, bats, and monkeys), as well as adaptation of the mouse model, by modifying either the host or the virus. In the present study, we utilized a natural pathogen of mice, MHV, as a prototype to model betacoronavirus-induced acute lung injure and multiorgan involvement under biosafety level 2 conditions. We showed that C57BL/6J mice intranasally inoculated with MHV-3 develops severe disease, which includes acute lung damage and respiratory distress that precede systemic inflammation and death. Accordingly, the proposed animal model may provide a useful tool for studies regarding betacoronavirus respiratory infection and related diseases.
Keywords: Betacoronavirus
MHV-3
Lung infection
COVID-19
Animal model
Tumor necrosis factor
keywords: Betacoronavírus
MHV-3
Infecção pulmonar
COVID-19
Modelo animal
Fator de necrose tumoral
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Citation: ANDRADE, Ana Cláudia dos SantosPereira et al. A Biosafety Level 2 Mouse Model for Studying Betacoronavirus- Induced Acute Lung Damage and Systemic Manifestations. Journal of Virology, v. 95, n. 22, e01276-21, p. 1-18, Nov. 2021.
DOI: 10.1128/JVI.01276-21
ISSN: 1098-5514
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos
CDTS - Artigos de Periódicos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Jaime_Temerozo_etal_IOC_2021.pdf7.72 MBAdobe PDFView/Open



FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInGoogle BookmarksBibTex Format mendeley Endnote DiggMySpace

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.