Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/50748
Title: SARS Antibody Testing in Children: Development of Oral Fluid Assays for IgG Measurements
Authors: Hoschler, Katja
Ijaz, Samreen
Andrews, Nick
Ho, Sammy
Dicks, Steve
Jegatheesan, Keerthana
Poh, John
Warrener, Lenesha
Kankeyan, Thivya
Baawuah, Frances
Beckmann, Joanne
Okike, Ifeanichukwu O.
Ahmad, Shazaad
Garstang, Joanna
Brent, Andrew J.
Brent, Bernadette
Aiano, Felicity
Brown, Kevin E.
Ramsay, Mary E.
Brown, David
Parry, John V.
Ladhani, Shamez N.
Zambon, Maria
Affilliation: Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom / Microbiology Services Laboratory, NHS Blood and Transplant. Bristol, United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom / Microbiology Services Laboratory, NHS Blood and Transplant. Bristol, United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom.
East London NHS Foundation Trust. London, United Kingdom.
Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. Derby, United Kingdom.
Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust. Manchester, United Kingdom.
Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust. Aston, United Kingdom.
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Oxford, United Kingdom / University of Oxford, Oxford. United Kingdom.
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Oxford, United Kingdom / University of Oxford, Oxford. United Kingdom.
Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom.
Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom.
Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Vírus Respiratórios e do Sarampo. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Immunisation and Countermeasures Division, Public Health England. London, United Kingdom / Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St. George’s University of London. London, United Kingdom.
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England. London. United Kingdom.
Abstract: Seroepidemiological studies to monitor antibody kinetics are important for assessing the extent and spread of SARS-CoV-2 in a population. Noninvasive sampling methods are advantageous for reducing the need for venipuncture, which may be a barrier to investigations, particularly in pediatric populations. Oral fluids are obtained by gingivacrevicular sampling from children and adults and are very well accepted. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) based on these samples have acceptable sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional serum-based antibody EIAs and are suitable for population-based surveillance. We describe the development and evaluation of SARS-CoV-2 IgG EIAs using SARSCoV- 2 viral nucleoprotein (NP) and spike (S) proteins in IgG isotype capture format and an indirect receptor-binding-domain (RBD) IgG EIA, intended for use in children as a primary endpoint. All three assays were assessed using a panel of 1,999 paired serum and oral fluids from children and adults participating in school SARS-CoV-2 surveillance studies during and after the first and second pandemic wave in the United Kingdom. The anti-NP IgG capture assay was the best candidate, with an overall sensitivity of 75% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 71 to 79%) and specificity of 99% (95% CI: 78 to 99%) compared with paired serum antibodies. Sensitivity observed in children (80%, 95% CI: 71 to 88%) was higher than that in adults (67%, CI: 60% to 74%). Oral fluid assays (OF) using spike protein and RBD antigens were also 99% specific and achieved reasonable but lower sensitivity in the target population (78%, 95% CI [68% to 86%] and 53%, 95% CI [43% to 64%], respectively).
Keywords: Antibody
COVID-19
Schools
Surveys
Children
Oral fluid
keywords: COVID-19
Anticorpos
Escolas
Pesquisas
Crianças
Fluido oral
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Citation: HOSCHLER, Katja et al. SARS Antibody Testing in Children: Development of Oral Fluid Assays for IgG Measurements. Microbiology Spectrum, v. 10, n. 1, e00786-21, p. 1-12, Jan. 2022.
DOI: 10.1128/spectrum.00786-21
ISSN: 2165-0497
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos
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