Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/7487
Title: Characteristics of the human host have little influence on which local Schistosoma mansoni populations are acquired.
Authors: Barbosa, Lúcio Macedo
Silva, Luciano Kalabric
Reis, Eliana Almeida Gomes
Carmo, Theomira Mauadie de Azevedo
Blank, Walter A
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Blanton, Ronald Edward
Costa, Jackson Mauricio Lopes
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Case Western Reserve University. Center for Global Health and Diseases. Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Case Western Reserve University. Center for Global Health and Diseases. Cleveland, Ohio, USA / Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Centre. Infectious Diseases Service. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centre. Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Abstract: Background: Brazil remains the country in the Americas with the highest prevalence of schistosomiasis. A combination of control efforts and development, however, has sharply reduced its intensity and distribution. The acquisition of specific schistosome populations may be dependent on host characteristics such as sex, age, geography, work, habits and culture. How these and other host characteristics align with parasite subpopulations may guide approaches to improve control. Methodology: A cohort of more than 90% of the residents in two rural communities in Brazil participated in an epidemiologic survey of demographic, socio-economic and behavioral characteristics. The variables sex, age, intensity of infection, socio-economic index, % lifetime spent on site, previous infection, and trips outside the district were used to group parasites infecting individuals. Schistosoma mansoni infection status was determined by examination of stools submitted on 3 different days. The aggregate of eggs collected from the whole stool was used to determine degree of population differentiation from allele frequencies for 15 microsatellites. Conclusions/Significance: Infection prevalence was 41% for these communities, and the epidemiologic characteristics were similar to many of the endemic areas of Brazil and the world. Parasite population structuring was observed between the two communities (Jost’s D 0.046, CI95% 0.042–0.051), although separated by only 8 km and connected by a highway. No structuring was observed when infected individuals were stratified by host’s biologic, demographic or epidemiologic characteristics. Those most heavily infected best reflected the communities’ overall parasite diversity. The lack of differentiation within villages suggests that individuals are likely to get infected at the same sites or that the same parasite multilocus genotypes can be found at most sites. The geographic structuring between villages and the lack of structuring by age of the host further supports the impression of a population little affected by migration or drift.
keywords: Esquistossomose
Schistosoma mansoni
Infecções parasitárias
Parasitas
Interações hospedeiro parasita
Características
Epidemiologia
Brasil
Idade
Sexo
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: BARBOSA, L. M. et al. Characteristics of the human host have little influence on which local Schistosoma mansoni populations are acquired. PLoS Neglected Tropical Disease, v. 7, n. 12, p. e2572, 2013.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002572
ISSN: 1935-2735
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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