Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/7488
Title: Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul virus, and Bartonella spp. among Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the urban slum environment in Brazil.
Authors: Costa, Federico
Porter, Fleur Helena
Rodrigues, Gorete
Farias, Helena
Faria, Marcos Tucunduva de
Wunder Júnior, Elsio Augusto
Osikowicz, Lynn M
Kosoy, Michael Y
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Ko, Albert Icksang
Childs, James E
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Yale University. School of Public Health. Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. New Haven, Connecticut
Yale University. School of Public Health. Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. New Haven, Connecticut
Ministério da Saúde. Secretaria Municipal de Saúde. Centro de Controle de Zoonoses. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Embrapa Amazônia Orienta. Belém, Pará, Brasil.
Yale University. School of Public Health. Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. New Haven, Connecticut
DVBID. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fort Collins. Colorado
DVBID. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fort Collins. Colorado
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Yale University. School of Public Health. Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. New Haven, Connecticut
Yale University School of Medicine. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and Center for Eco-Epidemiology. New Haven, Connecticut
Abstract: Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies evaluating the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in tropical Norway rat populations are rare, and data on co-infection with multiple pathogens are nonexistent. Herein, we describe the prevalence of leptospiral carriage, Seoul virus (SEOV), and Bartonella spp. infection independently, in addition to the rates of co-infection among urban, slum-dwelling Norway rats in Salvador, Brazil, trapped during the rainy season from June to August of 2010. These data were complemented with previously unpublished Leptospira and SEOV prevalence information collected in 1998. Immunofluorescence staining of kidney impressions was used to identify Leptospira interrogans in 2010, whereas isolation was used in 1998, and western blotting was used to detect SEOV antibodies in 2010, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used in 1998: in 2010, Bartonella spp. were isolated from a subsample of rats. The most common pathogen in both years was Leptospira spp. (83%, n=142 in 1998, 63%, n=84 in 2010). SEOV was detected in 18% of individuals in both 1998 and 2010 (n=78 in 1998; n=73 in 2010), and two species of Bartonella were isolated from 5 of 26 rats (19%) tested in 2010. The prevalence of all agents increased significantly with rat mass/age. Acquisition of Leptospira spp. occurred at a younger mass/age than SEOV and Bartonella spp. infection, suggesting differences in the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. These data indicate that Norway rats in Salvador serve as reservoir hosts for all three of these zoonotic pathogens and that the high prevalence of leptospiral carriage in Salvador rats poses a high degree of risk to human health.
Keywords: Leptospira interrogans
Seoul virus
Bartonella spp.
Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)
Brazil
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Citation: COSTA, F. et al. Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul virus, and Bartonella spp. among Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the urban slum environment in Brazil. Vector Borne Zoonotic Disease, v. 14, n. 1, p. 33-40, 2014.
ISSN: 1557-7759
10.1089/vbz.2013.1378
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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