Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/8718
Title: Role of Toll-like receptor 9 signaling in experimental Leishmania braziliensis infection.
Authors: Weinkopff, Tiffany
Mariotto, Anita
Simon, Gregoire
Torre, Yazmin Hauyon-La
Auderset, Floriane
Schuster, Steffen
Zangger, Haroun
Fasel, Nicolas
Barral, Aldina Maria Prado
Cottiera, Fabienne Tacchini
Affilliation: Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Universidade Federal da Bahia. Faculdade de Medicina. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Department of Biochemistrya and WHO-Immunology Research and Training Center / University of Lausanne. Epalinges, Switzerland
Abstract: Infection with Leishmania braziliensis causes cutaneous or mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in humans. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression has been found in granulomas of lesions in L. braziliensis-infected individuals. L. braziliensis inoculation in mice induces very small lesions that are self-healing, whereas deficiency in the TLR adaptor molecule, MyD88, renders mice susceptible to infection. The TLR involved has not been identified, prompting us to investigate if TLR9 triggering by the parasite contributes to the strong resistance to infection observed in L. braziliensis-inoculated mice. The parasites activated wild-type (WT) dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro but not DCs derived from TLR9(-/-) mice. TLR9(-/-) mice inoculated with L. braziliensis exhibited a transient susceptibility characterized by increased lesion size and parasite burden compared to those of WT mice. Surprisingly, elevated levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were measured at the site of infection and in draining lymph node T cells of TLR9(-/-) mice at the peak of susceptibility, suggesting that unlike observations in vitro, the parasite could induce DC activation leading to the development of Th1 cells in the absence of TLR9 expression. Taken together, these data show that TLR9 signaling is important for the early control of lesion development and parasite burden but is dispensable for the differentiation of Th1 cells secreting IFN-γ, and the high levels of this cytokine are not sufficient to control early parasite replication following L. braziliensis infection
DeCS: Leishmania braziliensis
Leishmaniose Cutânea/metabolismo
Receptor Toll-Like 9/fisiologia
Animais
Citocinas/metabolismo
Modelos Animais de Doenças
Feminino
Leishmaniose Cutânea/imunologia
Macrófagos/parasitologia
Camundongos
Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
Células Th1/imunologia
Receptor Toll-Like 9/deficiência
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Citation: WEINKOPFF, T. et al. Role of Toll-like receptor 9 signaling in experimental Leishmania braziliensis infection. Infection and Immunity, v. 81, n. 5, p. 1575-1584, 2013.
DOI: 10.1128/IAI.01401-12
ISSN: 1098-5522
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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