Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/23365
Title: Epizootic Outbreak of Yellow Fever Virus and Risk for Human Disease in Salvador, Brazil
Authors: Paploski, Igor Adolfo Dexheimer
Souza, Raquel Lima
Tauro, Laura Beatriz
Cardoso, Cristiane Wanderley
Mugabe, Vánio André
Alves, Anna Beatriz Pereira Simões
Gomes, Joice de Jesus
Kikuti, Mariana
Campos, Gubio Soares
Sardi, Sílvia
Weaver, Scott C
Reis, Mitermayer Galvão dos
Kitron, Uriel
Ribeiro, Guilherme de Sousa
Affilliation: Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Secretaria Municipal de Saúde de Salvador. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil
University of Texas Medical Branch. Galveston, Texas
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Emory University. Atlanta, Georgia
Universidade Federal da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Gonçalo Moniz. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Abstract: Background: Yellow fever virus (YFV) is an RNA virus maintained in an enzootic, sylvatic cycle involving nonhuman primates (NHPs) and sylvatic mosquito vectors primarily of the genus Haemagogus and Sabethes. Transmission occasionally spills over to humans entering forested regions. In the Americas, urban transmission of YFV to humans has not occurred since the mid-1900s because of vaccination and near-elimination of the anthropophilic Aedes aegypti, the urban vector (1). However, concerns about reemergence of urban YFV have recently increased because of the reappearance and rapid spread of A aegypti in the urban environment. Furthermore, immunization coverage for YFV is insufficient because vaccination is generally indicated only for higher-risk populations, such as those living in or travelling to areas with sylvatic transmission. Objective: To investigate the 2017 epizootic outbreak of YFV and the risk for human disease in Salvador, Brazil. Methods and Findings: Since November 2016, deaths of NHPs due to YFV in Brazil have been reported in the state of Sa˜o Paulo. Beginning in December 2016, human cases were also reported in the states of Sa˜o Paulo and Minas Gerais. By the end of May 2017, the YFV outbreak in humans had spread to 9 Brazilian states, with more than 130 municipalities reporting confirmed cases (Appendix Figure 1, available at www .annals.org), all deemed of sylvatic origin (rather than via urban A aegypti transmission).
Keywords: Yellow Fever
Virus
Disease outbreak investigation
Transmission
Aedes aegypti
Vaccination
Death
Risk factors
Humans
Brazil
keywords: Febre Amarela
Virus
Investigação de surto de doenças
Transmisão
Aedes aegypti
Vacinação
Óbito
Fatores de risco
Humanos
Brasil
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: American College of Physicians
Citation: PAPLOSKI, I. A. D. et al. Epizootic outbreak of yellow fever virus and risk for human disease in Salvador, Brazil. Annals of Internal Medicine, 2017.
DOI: 10.7326/M17-1949
ISSN: 0003-4819
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:BA - IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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