Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/42496
Title: Mediterranean Diet: Lipids, Inflammation, and Malaria Infection
Authors: Silva, Adriana R.
Moraes, Bianca P. T.
Albuquerque, Cassiano F. Gonçalves de
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Federal Fluminense. Programa de Neurociências. Niterói, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instittuto Oswaldo Cruz. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Federal Fluminense. Programa de Neurociências. Niterói, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Federal Fluminense. Programa de Neurociências. Niterói, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Molecular e Celular. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.
Abstract: The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) consists of consumption of vegetables and healthy oils and have beneficial effects on metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Our goal here is to discuss the role of fatty acid content in MedDiet, mostly omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 on malaria. Malaria affects millions of people around the globe. The parasite Plasmodium causes the disease. The metabolic and inflammatory alterations in the severe forms have damaging consequences to the host. The lipid content in the MedDiet holds anti-inflammatory and pro-resolutive features in the host and have detrimental effects on the Plasmodium. The lipids from the diet impact the balance of pro- and anti-inflammation, thus, lipids intake from the diet is critical to parasite elimination and host tissue damage caused by an immune response. Herein, we go into the cellular and molecular mechanisms and targets of the MedDiet fatty acids in the host and the parasite, reviewing potential benefits of the MedDiet, on inflammation, malaria infection progression, and clinical outcome.
Keywords: Mediterranean diet
Fatty acid
Omega-3
Omega-6
Omega-9
Inflammation
Malaria
keywords: Malária
Inflamação
Dieta mediterrânea
Ácido graxo
Õmega-3
Õmega-9
Õmega-6
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: SILVA, Adriana R.; MORAES, Bianca P. T.; ALBUQUERQUE, Cassiano F. Gonçalves de. Mediterranean Diet: Lipids, Inflammation, and Malaria Infection, v. 21, n. 4489, 22p, 2020.
DOI: 10.3390/ijms21124489
ISSN: 1661-6596
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IOC - Artigos de Periódicos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
AdrianaRSilva_BiancaPTMoraes_etal_al_IOC_2020.pdf976.73 kBAdobe PDFView/Open



FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInGoogle BookmarksBibTex Format mendeley Endnote DiggMySpace

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.