Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/7996
Title: Host genetics and population structure effects on parasitic disease
Authors: Blangero, Sarah Williams
Criscione, Charles D.
VandeBerg, John L.
Oliveira, Rodrigo Corrêa de
Williams, Kimberly D.
Subedi, Janardan
Kent Jr., Jack W.
Williams, Jeff
Kumar, Satish
Blangero, John
Affilliation: Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Department of Genetics. San Antonio, TX, USA
Texas A&M University. Department of Biology. College Station, TX, USA
Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Department of Genetics. San Antonio, TX, USA/Southwest National Primate Research Center. San Antonio, TX, USA
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil
Temple University. Department of Anthropology. Philadelphia, PA, USA
Miami University. Department of Sociology and Gerontology. Oxford, OH, USA
Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Department of Genetics. San Antonio, TX, USA
Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Department of Genetics. San Antonio, TX, USA
Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Department of Genetics. San Antonio, TX, USA
Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Department of Genetics. San Antonio, TX, USA
Abstract: Host genetic factors exert significant influences on differential susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In addition, population structure of both host and parasite may influence disease distribution patterns. In this study, we assess the effects of population structure on infectious disease in two populations in which host genetic factors influencing susceptibility to parasitic disease have been extensively studied. The first population is the Jirel population of eastern Nepal that has been the subject of research on the determinants of differential susceptibility to soil-transmitted helminth infections. The second group is a Brazilian population residing in an area endemic for Trypanosoma cruzi infection that has been assessed for genetic influences on differential disease progression in Chagas disease. For measures of Ascaris worm burden, within-population host genetic effects are generally more important than host population structure factors in determining patterns of infectious disease. No significant influences of population structure on measures associated with progression of cardiac disease in individuals who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were found.
Keywords: population structure
genetics of infectious disease susceptibility
intestinal worms
Chagas disease
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: The Royal Society
Citation: WILLIAMS-BLANGERO, Sarah et al. Host genetics and population structure effects on parasitic disease. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. 2012, vol. 367, pp. 887-894.
DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2011.0296
ISSN: 0962-8436
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:MG - IRR - Artigos de Periódicos

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